FUYUya
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MUROMACHI
This period runs from around 1333/1336 or 1392 to 1568 or 1573.

Information on these dates is not very clear and it depends on what you take as the starting point.


AZUCHI-MOMOYAMA
This period runs from around 1568/1573 to about 1600/1603 or 1615.

Information on these dates is not very clear and it depends on what you take as the starting point.


EDO
This period runs from around 1600/1603/1615 to 1868.

Information on these dates is not very clear and it depends on what you take as the starting point.


MEIJI
This period runs from 1868 to 1912.
(Jan 23, 1868 Jul 30, 1912)


TAISHŌ
This period runs from 1912 to 1926.
(Jul 31, 1912 Dec 25, 1926)


SHŌWA
This period runs from 1926 to 1989.
(Dec 26, 1926 - Jan 7, 1989)



AIGI
A full-length woman's KOSODE worn under the UCHIKAKE or KAIDORI. Generally patterned with KANOKO SHIBORI, a form of tie-dye. (source: www.thekimonogallery.com)


FURISODE
A kimono with long flowing sleeves. Only used by young girls and boys during the previous eras, but now only for young unmarried girls.


HITOEGINU
Literally “one layer”. HITOE used as a noun is a name for the unlined silk summer kimono. As an adjective, HITOE is used to describe a single-layered garment such as an unlined KARIGINU. (source: www.thekimonogallery.com)


KAJI SHŌZOKU
KAJI means fire and SHŌZOKU means clothes. I.e. clothes worn by fire-men and fire-women during the EDO period.
The term HIKESHI is also used referring to several part of this oufit. For example: HIKESHI HANTEN, a thick fireman’s jacket.


KATABIRA
Is an unlined summer kosode made of fine hemp cloth, often YŪZEN-dyed, and embellished with embroidery. The KATABIRA was often decorated with patterns that give a “cool” feeling, such as flowing water or snow. (source: www.thekimonogallery.com)


KIMONO
During the MEIJI period the word KIMONO or "thing to wear" started to be used as a general term for Japanese style clothes. Before this, each kimono was known by it's own name, for example: KOSODE or FURISODE. KIMONO now used as a general term for the many different styles and variety of original Japanse clothes that exist.


KOSHIMAKI
Means 'hip wrap': style of wear characterized by belting only the lower half of kosode at the waist and allowing the upper half to drape freely over a special obi that would create a hanger-like support. Also kosode of stiff brocade designed for this style. (source: www.thekimonogallery.com)


KOSODE
Means literally "small sleeves" and refers to the sleeve opening size. The garment originates from the undergarment used during the HEIAN era and became extremely popular during the EDO period. It allowed for the middle classes to show off their status within the Japanese society.


OBI
The OBI is the belt normally worn with a kimono. There exist various types of obi, indentified by either it's use, the formality and the material. For example: SAGE OBI are for KOSHIMAKI, and we have MARU OBI for formal occasions and HANHABA OBI for day to day use. KAKESHITA OBI are used for the AIGI and nowadays for the kimono used under the wedding UCHIKAKE.


RYŪKYŪ BINGATA
Are polychrome textiles dyed with stencils against a red or yellow ground; originated in the RYŪKYŪ Island (principally OKINAWA), where it was reserved for the nobility. Complex designs typically organized in parallel registers; pastels traditionally favored. Red sets the tone for the more colorful BINGATA designs, while deep blue patterns provide a cooler feel. (source: www.thekimonogallery.com)


UCHIKAKE/KAIDORI
This is a full-length unbelted outer robe with trailing hem. Until the Edo period, it was worn by women of samurai or noble families on special occasions. They would normally have short sleeves when used as a house-coat. Since then, it has become a part of Japanese traditional bridal costume. Now it is only used for the wedding ceremony. The wedding version will normally have long sleeves, as would be appropriate for young unmarried girls. The wedding day is the last day the bride will wear long sleeves on any style of kimono. Cotton or silk floss is put inside the hemline to give added weight and form at the bottom so it will trail when walking. (source: www.thekimonogallery.com)


YOGI
Is an oversized, padded kimono-form comforter. It is used sleeping when the weather is cold. They were often elaborately decorated in TSUTSUGAKI technique designs when it formed part of a brides trousseau. (source: www.thekimonogallery.com)


YUKATA
A very casual, unlined KOSODE, typically made of cotton or other vegetable fiber, usually dyed with INDIGO utilizing the KATAZOME technique, traditionally worn after a bath. Nowadays more commonly worn at festivals and at traditional Japanese inns. (source: www.thekimonogallery.com)


UBUGI
Some clothes for children.


Other
Here are some items that have not been given their own option, but are still interesting to see.

TOMESODE: formal kosode for married women at wedding and other formal occasions; typically decorated with yuzen-dyed motifs near the hem. Usually are adorned with family crests. (source: www.thekimonogallery.com)

HŌMONGI: Homon’ means 'to visit' and 'gi' is 'wear'. It is formal wear for both married and unmarried women. It can be worn at the parties or when calling on somebody. It is characterized by colorful designs running continuously over the seams. The length of the sleeves varies, unmarried women wear HŌMONGI with longer sleeves. HŌMONGI is usually worn with the a double-folded (fukuro) obi with matching obi-age (bustle sash) and obijime (a tyeing cord). (source: www.thekimonogallery.com)

UWAGI: Means outerware or jacket.


UNSPECIFIED
In some cases the KNM website does not specify the type of garment.



Court attire
The formal palace court attire for the nobles.


court ITSUTSUGINU
Is a set of 5 layers of UCHIKI, generally in set colour combinations to coincide with the seasons or occasions. They will show these colours at the edges when worn.


court UCHIKI
This is a lined version of the HITOE. Is often used to combine with multiple pieces, in particular for the ITSUTSUGINU set. They can be of various plain colours with jacquard designs or can have a repeating design and differnet colour linings.


court MO
The MO is an apron like garment with decoration that is worn from the waist on the back as a trail. It is part of the JŪNI-HITOE (12 layer unlined garments) outfit and for a very formal version of the ITSUTSUGINU set.


court HŌ
An open sided coat with double with sleeves and a longer part at the back that is trailing. The front doubles over and is closed with a cloth hook and button around the neck.


court SASHINUKI
These are a variation on the standard HAKAMA that has ties at the bottom of the trouser legs that can be used to tighten them around the anckles for easier movability.


court SOKUTAI
The SOKUTAI is a costume for military officers, aristocrats and the emperor at some ceremonial occasions.


court IKAN
This costume is for semi-formal use in the palace and at court. Normally worn with SASHINUKI HAKAMA trousers.


court HAKAMA
The HAKAMA used in court tend to be of the red variety for women, unles used for special costumes. They exist in a variety of lengths of which the HARIBAKAMA or NAGABAKAMA is the longest. This HAKAMA covers the feet and trails behind. To be able to walk in this HAKAMA you will have to lift and pull it to make space for your feet to move forward. It can be one and half to two times the length of the normal HAKAMA. The normal length HAKAMA for court is known as the KIRIBAKAMA.


court ŌGI
Means: fan. For court we have special large size fans made of HINOKI, japanese cypress, either plain or painted and decorated on both sides with tassels on either end


SAMURAI class attire
Some examples of clothes worn by the SAMURAI and their family members. For example KOSHIMAKI, hip-wrapping kimono, and KAZUKI, veil kimono, would have been worn by the female members. - DŌBUKU is a type of jacket worn by samurai during the earliers periods and is regarded as the prototype for the JINBAORI. It was very popular during the wars of the 15th and 16th centuries.


SAMURAI HITATARE
HITATARE is an upper garment, characterised by open sides, an open neckline, a double-width bodice and two-panel sleeves. It was originally worn as everyday wear by commoners, but as the samurai class rose in status, it became part of the samurai's official wardrobe while they served the shogunate government. In later years it became formal or ceremonial wear. After it became customary to make HAKAMA trousers using the same fabric as in HITATARE, the whole set was called HITATARE, which became later KAMISHIMO. (Source: Clothes of Samurai Warriors - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 3)


SAMURAI JINBAORI
Or JIMBAORI. Next to the actual armour, JINBAORI is an iconic garment for the SAMURAI. The Jinbaori is worn over the actual armour. Originally it was designed as a weatherproof functional garment. Gradually it became a symbol of power and was considered appropriate clothing for a warlord facing his death on the battlefield. Wool cloth was often used for this garment and designs as innovative as those used in helmets were adopted. (Source: Clothes of Samurai Warriors - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 3)


SAMURAI KAMISHIMO
Originally KAMISHIMO referred to top and bottom garments using fabrics of the same color and pattern. Since the early modern age it began to mean a specific combination of the sleeveless KATAGINU and HAKAMA trousers. More specifically HAN-KAMISHIMO refers to standard length HAKAMA, while NAGA-KAMISHIMO refers to the long HAKAMA trousers, which are for ceremonial occasions. When different fabrics are used for KATAGINU and HAKAMA, the outfit is specifically called TSUGI-KAMISHIMO. The KAMISHIMO became formal wear for the SAMURAI during the EDO period. (Source: Clothes of Samurai Warriors - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 3)


SAMURAI SUIKAN
The SUIKAN resembles the shape of the court version of the KARIGINU, but generally has a set of KIKUTOJI, chrysanthemum, knots in front and back of the garment and long cords attached to the neckline so that it could be worn as an open-neck garment. It is also shorter than the KARIGINU because it was usually worn tucked in the HAKAMA. This type of garment was during the HEIAN period worn by lower-rank government officials as well as by warriors and commoners who served court nobles. By the KAMAKURA period those who wore SUIKAN ranged from ordinary samurai to shoguns and retired emperors. (Source: Clothes of Samurai Warriors - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 3)


SAMURAI YOROI SHITAGI
The TNM uses SHITAGI, meaning: to wear underneath, as a reference for different garments that go under the armour, some also referred to as YOROISHITA, literally: underneath the armour. We find the following types: -YOROI HITATARE especially adapted to under-armour wear. -GUSOKUSHITA which is a cloth jacket like garment. -There is chain-mail. - MANCHIRA, which are extra cloth shoulderpads. (Source: Clothes of Samurai Warriors - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 3)


KABUKI theatre
Is a classical Japanese dance-drama. KABUKI theatre is known for the stylization of its drama and for the elaborate KUMADORI (make-up) worn by some of its performers. (Source: Wikipedia)


KYŌGEN theatre
Meaning: "mad words" or "wild speech" Is a form of traditional Japanese comic theater. It developed alongside NOH, was performed along with NOH as an intermission of sorts between NOH acts on the same stage, and retains close links to NOH in the modern day; therefore, it is sometimes designated NOH-KYŌGEN. Its contents are nevertheless not at all similar to the formal, symbolic, and solemn NOH theater; KYŌGEN is a comic form, and its primary goal is to make its audience laugh. (Source: Wikipedia)


NOH theatre
Or NŌ (Derived from the Sino-Japanese word for "skill" or "talent"), is a major form of classical Japanese dance-drama that has been performed since the 14th century. (Source: wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noh


NOH KARAORI
An elaborate, ornate garment typical of NOH costumes. It is primarily worn as an outer garment in female roles. KARAORI that uses the color red is referred to as IROIRI and is worn by the actor playing the role of a young woman, while KARAORI without red is referred to as IRONASHI and is worn for the roles of middle-aged, elderly women or women of divine nature. The garment may also be worn as an inner garment by actors in the roles of young noblemen. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


NOH ATSUITA
This type of inner garment is worn for a wide variety of male roles: young and old, noble and humble, even vengeful gods and demons. It is worn beneath HAPPI, SOBATSUGI or MIZUGOROMO. The name ATSUITA derives from the a weaving technique, as does KARAORI. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


NOH NUIHAKU
This costume is primarily worn as an inner garment for female roles. It is also worn around the waist, allowing the upper part to hang loosely down. It employs colorful embroidery and gold and silver leaf to create elaborate patterns. Together with KARAORI, it represents the Japanese sense of beauty in NOH costumes. NUIHAKU is also worn for male roles, such as courtiers and infants. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


NOH SURIHAKU
Inner garment for female roles. Patterns are created by pressing gold or silver leaf on paste which is applied in the desired confirguration on the fabric. Particularly, the so-called UROKUHAKU, or repeated pattern of triangular scales, symbolizes deep attachment and uncontrolled passion in women and is used for female roles who appear in NOH drama as a demon or serpent. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


NOH KARIGINU
Is a broad-sleeved outer garment for men. Worn for the role of an elderly man of divine nature or of high social status. The garment is either lined or unlined. The lined type mainly consists of a variety of gold brocade patterns appropriate for dignitaries, such as ministers and energetic roles, such as supernatural beings. The unlined type, uses RO or SHA fabric which incorporates gold thread is worn for elegant roles, such as court nobles. Plain, unlined KARIGINU signifies divinity as portrayed in the roles of aged gods or Shinto priests. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


NOH HAPPI
Broad-sleeved outer garment worn by warriors and demons. It represents armor and surreal roles. Like KARIGINU, HAPPI can be either lined or unlined to express the strength or gentleness of the character. Note that the unlined HAPPI is worn by actors playing the roles of armoured young noblemen of the HEIKE clan. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


NOH SOBATSUGI
This garment is formed by eliminating the sleeves from a lined HAPPI. It symbolizes a warrior in plain armour but also may be worn by actors playing Chinese characters. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


NOH HITATARE
A lined garment which is always worn with HAKAMA trousers. HAKAMA can be either half or full length. The full length HAKAMA is an important formal garment worn by warriors. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


NOH SUŌ
Is an unlined hemp garment which is worn with full-length HAKAMA. Being the informal version of HITATARE, this garment in NOH drama is the everyday wear of common warriors and the informal clothes of ordinary men. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


MIZUGOROMO
A solid or striped garment of lightweight woven silk fabric such as SUZUSHI, SHA and SHIKE. It is worn by almost all roles of both sexes and all ages. However, it is most frequently worn by actors playing monks, elderly men and labourers. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


NOH CHŌKEN
Is a typical NOH costume primarily worn by dancing female roles. Sleeves are sewn to the shoulder, but the sides of the body are left open. This costume can be worn instead of HAPPI by actors playing young noblemen of the HEIKE clan. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


NOH MAIGINU
This costume is exclusively worn for female dancing roles. It resembles the CHŌKEN, except that the sides of the body are closed and an overall motif is employed. This costume is worn tucked in at the waist or wrapped around the waist allowing the upper portion to hang loosely down. It is never worn over the inner garment as is CHŌKEN. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


NOH OOKUCHI
Formally called OOKUCHI-BAKAMA, these short-length trousers have tucks in the front which are made of a lustrous, supple silk fabric; the solid, flat, square back is made of ribbed fabric. These trousers are worn for both male and female roles of high ranks. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


NOH HANGIRI
or HANGIRE. The style is that of OOKUCHI, but the same fabric is used in both the front and back. The back contains a straw mat, TATAMI, interlining. A large patterned gold brocade on satin fabric is common. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


NOH KAZURA/KATSURA OBI
A narrow headband tied around the wig in female roles. Various embroidery and metal leaf ornamentations are added to the portion from the forehead to the back of the head and at both ends which hang form the back. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


NOH KOSHI OBI
A wide waist sash tied around KARIGINU, HAPPI, MIZUGOROMO and KOSHIMAKI. A cloth inter-lining is inserted into the portion around the back and of both the ends hanging in front. Decortive patterns are added to these portions, using embroidery and metal leaf. Patterns differ for male and female roles. (Source: Noh Costumes - Kyoto Shoin's Art Library of Japanese Textiles no. 8)


NOH SUMIBŌSHI
A type of headwear in NOH and KYŌGEN. The SUMIBŌSHI, or -angled hat-, is worn by monk roles, with the top folded into a triangle and the rear draped down the back of the performer. The part of the hat draped down the back is folded upwards, and when that portion is used to cover the side of the face, it is known as -to wear in the shamon style- or SHAMON BŌSHI, and is used for the roles of high priests. It is also known as the SUNBŌSHI. (Source: www.the-noh.com)


BUGAKU
Meaning: Court dance and music. It is a traditional dance that has been performed to select elites, mostly in the Japanese imperial court, for over twelve hundred years. (Source: Wikipedia)

The RYŌTŌ is part of the costume for the Dragon King, RYO-O, which is one of the dances.